The city is full of interesting things to see and do, you’ll never run out of things to do for days on end. There is always something up your alley if you just know where to look. And it makes working and living bearable for many. Despite the many preoccupations, though, we may feel suffocated at times and feel the need to get out and get a breather.

If you are not a fan of the great outdoors, now is the time to make an effort and start exploring the nearest one from where you are. With all the progress the world is making, a big chunk of these lands are now being converted into something else for a profit. So, get out of your comfort zone and see the world with a new set of eyes. Appreciate the beauty of nature and the great outdoors before there is nothing left for you to explore.

“In recent years, numerous experimental psychology studies have linked exposure to nature with increased energy and heightened sense of well-being,” reads an article from Rochester University. “Other studies suggest that the very presence of nature helps to ward off feelings of exhaustion and that 90 percent of people report increased energy when placed in outdoor activities.”

But what if not everyone likes hiking, camping or the beach? Are they just left to sit on the couch only to reach for their sunglasses when the glare through the window pane is too bright to see the computer screen?

Absolutely not. If hiking or camping isn’t your favorite pastime, fear not. For the people who prefer to avoid endangering their lives for fun, plenty of ways remain to enjoy the outdoors.

(Via: http://www.collegiatetimes.com/lifestyles/how-to-enjoy-the-great-outdoors-if-you-hate-hiking/article_76fd5cb4-0f4b-11e7-8871-efaaa268e383.html)

If you only open up your mind to all the possibilities, it is easy to understand why nothing beats communing with nature any time of the day. Outdoor exploration is also a big business where big companies can milk lots of money from.

“Outdoor recreation is a huge economic driver in Utah and Colorado, and we felt it wasn’t being respected,” said Sam Mix, outdoor marketing manager for Osprey Packs, which is headquartered in southwest Colorado. “Public lands are where our customers go to recreate. Without these big wide-open spaces, we’d have no business and no reason to exist.”

Made up of 1,200 companies, the Outdoor Industry Association is based in Boulder, Colorado, with an outreach office in Washington, D.C. The group estimates that consumers spend about $120 billion on outdoor recreation products each year, ranging from apparel to tents, bicycles and camping gear.

(Via: http://www.sacbee.com/news/nation-world/national/article141225133.html)

Since the weather and the season affect your chances of enjoying a day or two out in the outdoors, always take advantage of the good weather whenever you can. Nothing can rejuvenate the senses than getting away from the hustle and bustle of city life and enjoying the breeze and solitude that nature brings.

Those commercials and other anti-pollution efforts coincided with the beginning of the modern environmental movement. The “Crying Indian” public service announcement, in fact, premiered in April 1971, on the first Earth Day.

Passing environmental laws is one thing; changing cultural attitudes is something else again. Change can be a long process.

It’s encouraging to know that during the past 40 years, litter in the U.S. has declined more than 61 percent. Still, about 52 billion pieces of litter clutter the landscape of our beautiful country. Yours and mine. That’s a lot of bags to fill.

(Via: http://www.dailyjournal.net/2017/03/29/drinkers_contribute_most_to_littered_world/)

With threats of climate change and global warming just lurking on the horizon, we should all make an effort to clean up our act not just when visiting the outdoors but even in our daily city life. After all, it is still us who will suffer in the end and we might lose the chance to ever appreciate nature in the years to come.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *